Current Article

Dr. Joe Seabrooks, the president of Cedar Valley College

Contact: Ann Hatch
214-378-1819; ahatch@dcccd.edu

For immediate release — June 11, 2018

(DALLAS) — Cedar Valley College has received one of 13 grants from the Texas Workforce Commission totaling $992,526 awarded to Texas community colleges and universities for summer youth STEM camps. Funded through the Governor’s Summer Merit Program, the grants provide 1,047 scholarships for students ages 14-21 so that they can attend science, technology, engineering and mathematics camps that will help prepare them for future high-skill, high-demand jobs.

Cedar Valley’s grant of $95,235 will provide 120 scholarships for STEM-related camps, including: Black Girls Code, Coding with Drones, Bringing Math to Life, Cyber Defense Camp and Mobile Virtual Reality.

“Thanks to the hard work of our grant writers, we were able to secure these funds to help ensure that hands-on education for our children continues, even during the summer,” said Dr. Joe Seabrooks, president of Cedar Valley College. “The focus on STEM and technology helps prepare students for a constantly evolving workforce, and we are so pleased to do our part in advancing that cause.”

“The complex challenges of tomorrow require us to prepare today, and Texas’ continued investment in the fields of science, technology, engineering and math are an essential part of that preparation,” said Gov. Greg Abbott. “The Governor’s Summer Merit Program and the Texas Workforce Commission provide valuable tools in training students to excel. As our state’s workforce becomes more technologically advanced, the success of Texas depends on the skills of our youth to contribute to the growth of our workforce.”

The camps introduce students to advanced technologies and manufacturing, aerospace and defense, biotechnology and life sciences, information and computer technology and energy.

“The Governor's Summer Merit program inspires Texas youth to learn high-demand STEM skills in fields that will position them for success in the industries of the future,” said Andres Alcantar, TWC’s chairman. “I commend the continued commitment from our colleges and universities to offer and deliver high quality learning opportunities for these students.”

Several of the camps are specifically targeted to encourage young women and minorities to pursue further education and careers in STEM fields, including several at Cedar Valley College.

Some students will have the opportunity to take field trips that will give them access to high-tech equipment, such as 3D printers and electron telescopes, while others will visit science and engineering facilities and have the opportunity to meet and speak with industry professionals.

The other 2018 Summer Merit Program grant recipients are: Tarrant County College (STEM-focused summer day camps); the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center (STAR Camps); University of Texas at Austin (for engineering and sciences camps); Texas A&M Engineering Experiment Station (TEES BioFORCE Camps); Lamar University (residential summer camp); Victoria College (TexPREP); UT-San Antonio (Engineering and Rapid Prototype Design camps); St. Mary’s University of San Antonio (engineering summer camps); South Texas College (robotics and automation camps); San Jacinto Community College (ROC/Aero day camps); Houston Community College (STEM camps on cyber security/application development); and UT Medical Branch at Galveston (summer camps). 

For more information about Cedar Valley’s grant, contact Henry Martinez, director of marketing, by email at hmartinez@dcccd.edu or by phone at 972-860-8142.

For details about TWC and the services it offers in coordination with its network of local workforce development boards, call 512-463-8942 or visit www.texasworkforce.org

 # # #