Articulation Agreements > Articulation Agreements Between DCCCD and Universities > Midwestern State University - General Agreement

Midwestern State University - General Agreement

ARTICULATION AGREEMENT
Between
Midwestern State University
and
Dallas County Community College District

Statement of purpose

Dallas County Community College District (hereafter referred to as “DCCCD”) - including all of the following DCCCD campuses: Brookhaven, Cedar Valley, Eastfield, El Centro, Mountain View, North Lake, and Richland and Midwestern State University hereby agree to an educational partnership to create a seamless transfer process for students transferring the DCCCD’s associate degrees into baccalaureate major-based degree programs at Midwestern State University.  The exception to this is as follows: AAS degrees from these five DCCCD colleges will be accepted in transfer – Brookhaven, Cedar Valley, El Centro, Mountain View, and Richland.  However, all DCCCD students who take core courses within their AAS degree, such core courses will be transferable.

Midwestern State University proposes to accept accredited technical-vocational, work force education and academic courses towards the Bachelor of Applied Arts and Sciences degree as outlined below.

Sixty-nine hours of college level credits earned at a junior college are acceptable in transfer and applicable to this degree.  In most cases, the majority of the credits earned will fulfill requirements in the occupational specialty, professional development and core areas with the remainder applying as electives.  Additional credits may be granted for learning experiences that are classified as nontraditional, and for senior college transfer hours.

Midwestern State University accepts nontraditional credit towards the B.A.A.S. from sources such as: CLEP, DANTES, correspondence courses, work experience, military service, self-study authenticated by examination, ACE and APICS.

Occupational Specialty is comprised of accredited vocational-technical courses, accredited work force education courses and academic courses. 

Professional Development courses are key to the B.A.A.S. program and consist of course selections custom designed for each student’s career objective.  Courses are selected from one or more academic specialties to provide a focus that will complement the students’ academic background and needs.

In the State of Texas, the common course numbering system will assist students in transferring core requirements.  Your school may have other courses that are not offered at Midwestern State University that may transfer and satisfy core requirements.  The Admissions Office at Midwestern State University will evaluate these hours during the first semester of enrollment.

A student must demonstrate computer literacy by taking a proficiency test or earning credit for CMPS 1023 (COSC 1300), CMPS 1043, or BUAD 2153 (COSC 1401 or BCIS 1405), or EDUC 1023. 

Find the Texas Common Course Numbers for Midwestern State University and information about the B.A.A.S. degree plan.  A form for the B.A.A.S. degree plan is included.

A minimum of 31 semester hours must be completed in residence at Midwestern State University.  Students must meet all Midwestern State University requirements for graduation.

Agreement continuation and dissolution:

This agreement will be in effect indefinitely, unless stated otherwise, or in the case the participating institution loses its accreditation status or there are significant curriculum changes that would warrant a new agreement. The DCCCD Chancellor and Midwestern State University President, or their designees must approve amendments to this agreement. This agreement is effective upon signing by the involved parties, and each is free to publicize this partnership in a manner consistent with the agreement. This articulation agreement shall remain effective until one, or both, institutions deem it necessary to terminate it. 

Notice and requests:

All notices, requests and other communication required shall be done in writing and delivered to:

Dallas County Community College District
Dr. Jesus "Jess" Carreon
Chancellor
Date:_____

Dr. Andrew Jones
Vice Chancellor, Educational Affairs
Date:_____
Midwestern State University
Dr. Friederike Wiedemann
Provost
Date:_____

J. David Martin, Ph.D.
B.A.A.S. Program Director
Date:_____


BACHELOR OF APPLIED ARTS AND SCIENCES
Midwestern State University
3410 Taft Boulevard
Wichita Falls, Texas 76308-2099

J. David Martin, Director B.A.A.S. Program(Bea Wood Hall 122)
david.martin@mwsu.edu
Charles Olson, Associate Director (Bea Wood Hall 100)
charles.olson@mwsu.edu
940-397-4400 / FAX 940-397-4918
http://libarts.mwsu.edu/baas

MISSION STATEMENT

The Bachelor of Applied Arts and Sciences (B.A.A.S.) degree is designed to offer students with workforce education, vocational-technical training and/or professional experience in occupational fields the opportunity to obtain a baccalaureate degree. Such experienced professional/vocational students may obtain credit toward this degree via regionally accredited college-level course work and/or certain types of professional and educational training.  Students who pursue the degree are required to complete the academic core requirements, thirty hours of advanced credit that is complementary to the vocational-technical or professional area, and any additional hours necessary to meet the 124-hour university requirement as stated in the catalog.

ADMISSION TO PROGRAM

Before a student can be admitted, the student must arrange an interview with the Director or Associate Director of the B.A.A.S. Program.

B.A.A.S. students are limited to not more than twenty-five percent of their total semester credit hours in courses transferable to a program in a school of business and not more than fifteen semester credit hours in business school courses completed at Midwestern State University.  However, students may select a minor in Business Administration with the approval of the Dean of the College of Business Administration. 

Students currently enrolled at Midwestern State University in a designated degree program who satisfy the intent of the mission statement and have at least a 2.75 g.p.a. will be allowed to transfer to the B.A.A.S. degree program.  Exceptions to this policy will be considered on an individual basis by the B.A.A.S. Advisory Committee.  In such cases, the student must submit to the committee an application accompanied by a letter of recommendation from an adviser in the student’s previous major. 

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

The student must complete a baccalaureate degree plan from residence and transfer credit hours by meeting the requirements as follows: 

Option A:  The Traditional B.A.A.S. Program 

Academic Foundations and Core Curriculum 

Occupational Specialty (24-36 semester hours)

Credits toward an area of coherent specialization may be earned from junior or community colleges, this university and other senior institutions, workforce education, vocational or technical schools, armed forces schools, work experiences, and nontraditional learning experiences that can be equated to college credit.  Credit for work experience is limited to a maximum of 6 semester hours based on a maximum of 2 hours for each year of successful qualifying experience related to the student’s occupational specialty.  Credit for nontraditional experiences is granted on the basis of evaluation by the Director and the B.A.A.S. Advisory Committee utilizing the National Guide of the American Council on Education (A.C.E.) and other appropriate publications.  Documentation will be placed in the student’s permanent file in the Office of the Registrar.  A minimum of 24 semester hours in the area of occupational specialty must be completed before the student can be accepted into the program. Cognate vocational-technical courses may be accepted within the area of occupational specialty or professional development. 

Professional Development (36 semester hours, 30 of which must be advanced and may include 6 hours of B.A.A.S. Internship)

The courses taken in this area will be chosen on the basis that they will give academic depth or breadth to the area of specialization or will provide substantive developmental knowledge for the student’s career or personal goals. 

Option B:  The B.A.A.S. Program with Criminal Justice Emphasis 

The Criminal Justice emphasis provides students the background to pursue employment options in the criminal justice career field. The combination of courses such as law enforcement, political science, psychology, sociology, and social work prepares those already working in the field for career advancement.  For those wishing to enter a criminal justice field, the degree offers the graduate the possibility of employment in a variety of career fields such as federal, state, and local law enforcement, institutional and community-based corrections, and criminal investigations. 

Academic Foundations and Core Curriculum 

Occupational Specialty (24-36 semester hours)

Credits toward an area of coherent specialization may be earned from junior or community colleges, this university and other senior institutions, workforce education, vocational or technical schools, armed forces schools, work experiences, and nontraditional learning experiences that can be equated to college credit.  Credit for work experience is limited to a maximum of 6 semester hours based on a maximum of 2 hours for each year of successful qualifying experience related to the student’s occupational specialty.  Credit for nontraditional experiences is granted on the basis of evaluation by the Director and the B.A.A.S. Advisory Committee utilizing the National Guide of the American Council on Education (A.C.E.) and other appropriate publications.  Documentation will be placed in the student’s permanent file in the Office of the Registrar.  A minimum of 24 semester hours in the area of occupational specialty must be completed before the student can be accepted into the program. Cognate vocational-technical courses may be accepted within the area of occupational specialty or professional development. 

Professional Development (36 semester hours, 30 of which must be advanced)

  • Two courses chosen from any four of the following six categories for a total of twenty-four advanced hours.
  • An additional twelve hours of courses chosen from any of the six subject areas listed below; at least six hours must be advanced courses (3000-4000).
    • English
    • Political Science
    • History and Geography
    • Psychology
    • Humanities/Philosophy
    • Sociology

NOTE:  Any B.A.A.S. student may petition to apply lower or upper division foreign language courses to the above option; approval must be obtained from the Director of the B.A.A.S. program or the Dean of the College of Liberal Arts.
B.A.A.S. Internship:

BAAS 3113.  Internship Public Administration 3(0-3)

Prerequisite:  Junior standing.

Students will be assigned jobs that can be demonstrated to be an integral learning portion of their career development in approved employment situations.  Students will be supervised by their employer and the Director of the B.A.A.S. program.  Applications for internship require the approval of the B.A.A.S. Director.  Application for permission to enroll in the internship must be received by the Director no later than three weeks prior to registration.  The internship may be repeated once for additional credit up to a maximum of six semester hours of internship for the degree.  B.A.A.S. students enrolled in the internship should keep a journal relating to the internship, noting the tasks undertaken and relating how they relate to employment and future career goals.  From that journal, students should write an internship report of no less than five double spaced pages relating learning experience to career objectives.  The report is due no later than one week before the end of the applicable term.

ACADEMIC FOUNDATIONS AND CORE CURRICULUM

To achieve the goals of academic foundations the faculty of Midwestern State University has developed a core curriculum for all baccalaureate degrees, which each student is expected to complete substantially before beginning academic specialization. The following objectives underlie the design of the core curriculum.

The curriculum is designed to provide each student a range of knowledge, skills, and intellectual approaches that will support his/her efforts to develop a full and productive life. To meet this objective the University offers a course of study that contributes to the development of a meaningful career and to the continued growth of the student both as an individual and as a rational and ethical member of society.

First, the curriculum emphasizes the acquisition of fundamental skills--skills necessary to learning, judgment, and self-expression. Chief among these are reading, analytical and critical thinking, cogent oral and written expression, computation, and quantitative reasoning.

Secondly, the curriculum seeks to develop each student’s understanding of him/herself in relation to others through a study of the liberal arts and sciences. Such study provides exposure to the collective knowledge and experience of mankind; each student is introduced to disciplined ways to gather, organize, and communicate this knowledge and experience as they relate to the cultural, social, and physical environment.

In the aggregate, the core curriculum provides a substantial base for the second phase of university education; academic specialization to achieve significant mastery in at least one discipline or interdisciplinary field. The core curriculum not only introduces students to a variety of disciplines (and thus to related career options), but more importantly provides a perspective from which to view specialized study in relation to the whole range of human experience and endeavor. As the student proceeds to academic specialization, it becomes the responsibility of each academic department to maintain and nurture this integrating perspective.

CORE REQUIREMENTS

    COMMUNICATION - 9 semester hours

    ENGL 1113 and 1123
    And 3 hours from SPCH 1133 or 1233 

    MATHEMATICS - 3 semester hours 

    MATH 1053, 1113, 1203, 1233, 1433, 1533, 1634, 1734, 2033, 2043 

    SCIENCE - 6 semester hours 

    BIOL 1134, 1144, 1234, 1544
    CHEM 1101 and 1103, 1141 and 1143, 1203, 1241 and 1243
    ENSC 1114
    GEOL 1134, 1233
    GNSC 1104, 1204 (for teacher certification students only)
    PHYS 1144, 1244, 1533, 1624, 2014, 2114, 2644 

    HUMANITIES & VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS - 9 semester hours 

    Six hours from English literature, history, humanities, philosophy, or two semesters of one foreign language; any courses in art history, music history, or theatre history may also be accepted in fulfillment of the humanities requirement:

    ENGL 2413, 2423, 2613, 2623, 2723, 2813, 2823
    HIST 1333, 1433, 3133
    HUMA 2013, 2023, 2033, 2043, 2053
    PHIL 1033, 1533, 2033, 2233, 2633
    FREN 1134, 1234
    GERM 1134, 1234
    SPAN 1134, 1234 

    3 hours from ART 1213, 1413, MUSC 1033, THEA 1503, MCOM 2213
    or
    3 hours from ART 1113, 1123, 1313, MUSC 1103, 1603/1601, THEA 2533
    or
    3 hours from MUSC 1001 and/or 1021

    SOCIAL & BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES - 18 semester hours

    HIST 1133 and 1233
    POLS 1333 and 1433
    ECON 1333 or 2333
    And 3 hours from PSYC 1103 or SOCL 1133 

    INSTITUTIONALLY DESIGNATED OPTION - 3 semester hours 

    KNES 1011 and a two-hour activity course
    or
    Two different activity courses excluding KNES 1011
    or
    Two semesters of marching band and one activity course
    or
    Four semesters of credit in marching band 

    EXCEPTIONS TO PHYSICAL ACTIVITIES REQUIREMENT

    A student may be excused from the physical activities requirement for the following reasons:

    • If the student is a veteran of the U.S. armed forces (discharged under honorable conditions) who has had one year of continuous active military service.
    • If the student has received a physical activities exemption through the Vinson Health Center. Students with disabling conditions should consult their physicians concerning enrolling in the adapted physical education course.