Fast Facts > Legal Notices > Student and Employee Rights and Responsibilities

Student and Employee Rights and Responsibilities

DCCCD wants you to know about important health and safety information that will help make your college experience successful:

  • The Drug Free Schools and Communities Act
  • Bacterial meningitis vaccination requirements
  • DCCCD’s Student Code of Conduct and notice on hazing
  • Title IX and campus sexual assault 
  • Student rights under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA)

Our Student and Employee Rights and Responsibilities brochure (PDF - 1.47MB) has the details.



2018-19 STUDENT AND EMPLOYEE RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES

Included in this notice is important info you should know about:

  • The Drug Free Schools and Communities Act

  • Bacterial Meningitis and the state law requiring vaccinations

  • DCCCD’s Student Code of Conduct Notice on Hazing

  • Title IX and Campus Sexual Assault

  • Student Rights Under the Family Educational Rights & Privacy Act (FERPA)

Drug Free Schools and Communities Act Notice 2018-19

The colleges of the Dallas County Community College District, including Brookhaven, Cedar Valley, Eastfield, El Centro, Mountain View, North Lake and Richland, and its administrative facilities, are committed to creating an educational and work environment free from use or distribution of illicit drugs and abuse of alcohol. As such, and in accordance with its obligations under the Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act of Amendments of 1989, the College district prohibits the unlawful use, possession, distribution, manufacture, possession for purposes of distribution, or sale of illicit drugs or alcohol on College District property or premises or at College District-sponsored activities, except as authorized by the Chancellor with respect to a specific event, instructional program or activity.

Sanctions

College District Disciplinary Sanctions

Violations of the College District drug and alcohol policy shall be subject to all applicable legal sanctions under local, state, or federal law, as well as all applicable College Disciplinary sanctions up to and including academic suspension or expulsion or termination of employment. College District disciplinary proceedings will occur in accordance with the procedures outlined in the College District Board Policy Manual. Violations of the College District drug and alcohol policy that are also violations of federal, state, or local law may be referred to the appropriate agency. In such situations, cases may proceed concurrently through the College District disciplinary process and in the criminal justice system.

Federal, State and Local Penalties and Sanctions

Local, state and federal laws prohibit the unlawful use, distribution, manufacture, possession for purposes of distribution, and sale of alcohol and controlled substances. These laws carry penalties for violations, including, but not limited to, fines, imprisonment, forfeiture of property and denial of federal benefits such as student loans, grants, etc. See also Title 21, United States Code (USC), Controlled Substances Act; and Chapter 481, Texas Health and Safety Code, the Texas Controlled Substances Act. Additionally, the different municipalities within Dallas County have ordinances relating to the use of controlled substances, for which penalties may be imposed. All applicable legal sanctions under local, state or federal law for the unlawful possess or distribution of illicit drugs or alcohol will be applied.

DCCCD Drug and Alcohol Prevention Efforts

College District staff, students, health center professionals, college police and counselors are working together to eliminate drug and alcohol abuse both on and off campus. Activities and opportunities vary by college, but all are united to ensure College District students and staff are aware of the problems and dangers of drug and alcohol abuse. Information and confidential referrals concerning counseling and treatment programs for drug and alcohol abuse may be obtained from any College District Counseling and/or Advisement Center, Health Center and/or location Human Resources Office.

Some of the programs that have been most effective in recent years include:

Red Ribbon Campaigns

In conjunction with Texas War on Drugs Week and National Red Ribbon Day, some of the colleges of DCCCD have a Red Ribbon Day in the month of October. Students who are committed to living drug-free wear red ribbons on that day. Throughout the academic year, various student activities are offered by the colleges to promote a drug-free lifestyle.

Peer Counseling Education

If you have a problem with drugs or alcohol, one of your classmates is available to talk with you and provide the information and counseling you need or to refer you to resources to deal with your specific situation.

Recover Network Groups/Alcoholics Anonymous/12-Step Programs

Some of the colleges of DCCCD have 12-step or other recovery programs to help individuals overcome chemical or alcohol dependency. You can get information about these programs through your college Health Center or counseling offices.

Alcohol-Free Happy Hour

College offices of Student Life present various alcohol-free activities as alternatives to the kind of social events that are built around alcohol and/or drug use. Drop by your college office of Student Life for information about the many student activities and intramural sports programs for both day and evening students.

IF YOU WANT TO BE A PART OF ANY OF THESE OR OTHER PROGRAMS PROMOTING A DRUG-FREE LIFESTYLE OR IF YOU NEED COUNSELING, VISIT WITH YOUR COLLEGE COUNSELOR, OFFICE OF STUDENT LIFE OR HEALTH CENTER FOR MORE INFORMATION.

Health Risks

Alcohol Effects

Alcohol consumption causes a number of marked changes in behavior. Even low doses significantly impair the judgment and coordination required to drive an automobile safely, increasing the likelihood that the driver will be involved in an accident. Low to moderate doses of alcohol also increase the incidence of a variety of aggressive acts, including spouse and child abuse. Moderate to high doses of alcohol cause marked impairments in higher mental functions, severely altering a person’s ability to learn and remember information. Very high doses may cause respiratory depression and death. If combined with other depressants of the central nervous system, much lower doses of alcohol will produce the effects just described.

Repeated use of alcohol can lead to dependence. Sudden cessation of alcohol intake is likely to produce withdrawal symptoms, including severe anxiety, tremors, hallucinations, and convulsions. Alcohol withdrawal can be life-threatening. Long-term consumption of large quantities of alcohol, particularly when combined with poor nutrition, can also lead to permanent damage to vital organs such as the liver or the brain.

Mothers who drink alcohol during pregnancy may give birth to infants with fetal alcohol syndrome. These infants have irreversible physical abnormalities and mental retardation. In addition, research indicates that children of alcoholic parents are at greater risk than other youngsters of becoming alcoholics.

Drug Effects

The use of drugs is harmful to one’s physical, mental, and social well-being. Drugs can be categorized into five major categories or schedules. Those categories are listed below and include the risks and federal trafficking penalties associated with each.

Drug Schedules

Drugs, substances, and certain chemicals used to make drugs are classified into five (5) distinct categories or schedules depending upon the drug’s acceptable medical use and the drug’s abuse or dependency potential. The abuse rate is a determinate factor in the scheduling of the drug; for example, Schedule I drugs have a high potential for abuse and the potential to create severe psychological and/or physical dependence. As the drug schedule changes-- Schedule II, Schedule III, etc., so does the abuse potential-- Schedule V drugs represent the least potential for abuse. A listing of drugs and their corresponding schedules is located at Controlled Substance Act (CSA) Scheduling or CSA Scheduling by Alphabetical Order. These lists describe the basic or parent chemical and do not necessarily describe the salts, isomers and salts of isomers, esters, ethers and derivatives which may also be classified as controlled substances. These lists are intended as general references and are not comprehensive listings of all controlled substances.

Please note that a substance need not be listed as a controlled substance to be treated as a Schedule I substance for criminal prosecution. A controlled substance analogue is a substance which is intended for human consumption and is structurally or pharmacologically substantially similar to or is represented as being similar to a Schedule I or Schedule II substance and is not an approved medication in the United States. (See 21 U.S.C. §802(32)(A) for the definition of a controlled substance analogue and 21 U.S.C. §813 for the applicable schedule.)

Schedule I

Schedule I drugs, substances, or chemicals are defined as drugs with no currently accepted medical use and a high potential for abuse. Some examples of Schedule I drugs are: heroin, lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), marijuana (cannabis), 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (ecstasy), methaqualone, and peyote

Schedule II

Schedule II drugs, substances, or chemicals are defined as drugs with a high potential for abuse, with use potentially leading to severe psychological or physical dependence. These drugs are also considered dangerous. Some examples of Schedule II drugs are: Combination products with less than 15 milligrams of hydrocodone per dosage unit (Vicodin), cocaine, methamphetamine, methadone, hydromorphone (Dilaudid), meperidine (Demerol), oxycodone (OxyContin), fentanyl, Dexedrine, Adderall, and Ritalin

Schedule III

Schedule III drugs, substances, or chemicals are defined as drugs with a moderate to low potential for physical and psychological dependence. Schedule III drugs abuse potential is less than Schedule I and Schedule II drugs but more than Schedule IV. Some examples of Schedule III drugs are: Products containing less than 90 milligrams of codeine per dosage unit (Tylenol with codeine), ketamine, anabolic steroids, testosterone

Schedule IV

Schedule IV drugs, substances, or chemicals are defined as drugs with a low potential for abuse and low risk of dependence. Some examples of Schedule IV drugs are: Xanax, Soma, Darvon, Darvocet, Valium, Ativan, Talwin, Ambien, Tramadol

Schedule V

Schedule V drugs, substances, or chemicals are defined as drugs with lower potential for abuse than Schedule IV and consist of preparations containing limited quantities of certain narcotics. Schedule V drugs are generally used for antidiarrheal, antitussive, and analgesic purposes. Some examples

of Schedule V drugs are: cough preparations with less than 200 milligrams of codeine or per 100 milliliters (Robitussin AC), Lomotil, Motofen, Lyrica, Parepectolin

An updated and complete list of the schedules is published annually in Title 21 Code of Federal Regulations (C.F.R.) §§ 1308.11 through 1308.15.

dea.gov/druginfo/ds.shtml

Federal Trafficking Penalties - Chart One

DRUG/SCHEDULE QUANTITY PENALTIES QUANTITY PENALTIES

Cocaine (Schedule II)

500–4999 grams mixture

First Offense: Not less than 5 yrs, and not more than 40 yrs. If death or serious injury, not less than 20 or more than life. Fine of not more than $5 million if an individual, $25 million if not an individual.

Second Offense: Not less than 10 yrs, and not more than life. If death or serious injury, life imprisonment. Fine

of not more than $8 million if an individual,

$50 million if not an individual.

5 kgs or more mixture

First Offense: Not less than 10 yrs, and not more than life. If death or serious injury, not less than

20 or more than life. Fine of not more than $10 million if an individual, $50 million if not an individual.

Second Offense: Not less than 20 yrs, and not more than life. If death or serious injury, life imprisonment. Fine of not more than

$20 million if an individual, $75 million if not an individual.

2 or More Prior Offenses: Life imprisonment. Fine of not more than $20 million if an individual, $75 million if not an individual.

Cocaine Base (Schedule II)

28–279 grams mixture

280 grams or more mixture

Fentanyl (Schedule II)

40–399 grams mixture

400 grams or more mixture

Fentanyl Analogue (Schedule I)

10–99 grams mixture

100 grams or more mixture

Heroin (Schedule I)

100–999 grams mixture

1 kg or more mixture

LSD (Schedule I)

1–9 grams mixture

10 grams or more mixture

Methamphetamine (Schedule II)

5–49 grams pure or 50–499 grams mixture

50 grams or more pure or 500 grams or more mixture

PCP (Schedule II)

10–99 grams pure or 100–999 grams mixture

100 gm or more pure or 1 kg or more mixture

PENALTIES

Other Schedule I & II drugs (and any drug product containing Gamma Hydroxybutyric Acid)

Any amount

First Offense: Not more than 20 yrs. If death or serious injury, not less than 20 yrs, or more than life. Fine $1 million if an individual, $5 million if not an individual.

Second Offense: Not more than 30 yrs. If death or serious bodily injury, life imprisonment. Fine $2 million if an individual, $10 million if not an individual.

Flunitrazepam (Schedule IV)

1 gram

Other Schedule III drugs

Any amount

First Offense: Not more than 10 years. If death or serious injury, not more that 15 yrs. Fine not more than $500,000 if an individual, $2.5 million if not an individual.

Second Offense: Not more than 20 yrs. If death or serious injury, not more than 30 yrs. Fine not more than $1 million if an individual, $5 million if not an individual.

All other Schedule IV drugs

Any amount

First Offense: Not more than 5 yrs. Fine not more than $250,000 if an individual,

$1 million if not an individual.

Second Offense: Not more than 10 yrs. Fine not more than $500,000 if an individual, $2 million if other than an individual.

Flunitrazepam (Schedule IV)

Other than 1 gram or more

All Schedule V drugs

Any amount

First Offense: Not more than 1 yr. Fine not more than $100,000 if an individual,

$250,000 if not an individual.

Second Offense: Not more than 4 yrs. Fine not more than $200,000 if an individual,

$500,000 if not an individual.

Federal Trafficking Penalties - Chart Two

FEDERAL TRAFFICKING PENALTIES—MARIJUANA
DRUG QUANTITY 1st OFFENSE 2nd OFFENSE *

Marijuana (Schedule I)

1,000 kg or more marijuana mixture;

or 1,000 or more marijuana plants

Not less than 10 yrs. or more than life. If death or serious bodily injury, not less than 20 yrs., or more than life. Fine not more than $10 million if an individual, $50 million if other than an individual.

Not less than 20 yrs. or more than life. If death or serious bodily injury, life imprisonment. Fine not more than $20 million

if an individual, $75 million if other than an

individual.

Marijuana (Schedule I)

100 kg to 999 kg marijuana mixture;

or 100 to 999 marijuana plants

Not less than 5 yrs. or more than 40 yrs. If death or serious bodily injury, not less than 20 yrs. or more than life. Fine not more than $5 million if an individual, $25 million if other than an individual.

Not less than 10 yrs. or more than life. If death or serious bodily injury, life imprisonment. Fine not more than $20 million if an individual,

$75million if other than

an individual.

Marijuana (Schedule I)

More than 10 kgs hashish;

50 to 99 kg marijuana mixture

More than 1 kg of hashish oil; 50 to 99 marijuana plants

Not more than 20 yrs. If death or serious bodily injury, not less than 20 yrs. or more than life. Fine $1 million if an individual, $5 million if other than an individual.

Not more than 30 yrs. If death or serious bodily injury, life imprisonment.

Fine $2 million if an individual, $10 million if

other than an individual.

Marijuana (Schedule I)

Less than 50 kilograms marijuana (but does not include 50 or more marijuana plants regardless

of weight)

1 to 49 marijuana plants;

Not more than 5 yrs. Fine not more than $250,000, $1 million if other than an individual.

Not more than 10 yrs. Fine

$500,000 if an individual,

$2 million if other than individual.

Hashish (Schedule I)

10 kg or less

Hashish Oil (Schedule I)

1 kg or less

*The minimum sentence for a violation after two or more prior convictions for a felony drug offense have become final is a mandatory term of life imprisonment without release and a fine up to $20 million if an individual and $75 million if other than an individual.

Controlled Substances - Uses and Effects

Controlled Substances – Uses and Effects
DRUGS CSA SCHEDULES TRADE OR OTHER NAMES MEDICAL USES DEPENDENCE Physical Psychological TOLERANCE DURATION (Hours) USUAL METHODS OF ADMINISTRATION POSSIBLE EFFECTS EFFECTS OF OVERDOSE WITHDRAWAL SYNDROME
NARCOTICS
Opium II III V Dover's Powder, Paregoric, Parepectolin Analgesic, Antidiarrheal High High Yes 3-6 Oral, smoked Euphoria, drowsiness, respiratory depression, constricted pupils, nausea Slow and shallow breathing, clammy skin, convulsions, coma, possible death Watery eyes, runny nose, yawning, loss of appetite, irritability, tremors, panic, cramps, nausea, chills, and sweating
Morphine II III Morphine, MS-Contin, Roxanol, Roxanol-SR Analgesic, Antitussive High High Yes 3-6 Oral, smoked, injected
Codeine Tylenol w/Codeine, Empirin w/Codeine, Robitussan A-C, Fiorinal w/Codeine Analgesic, Antitussive Moderate Moderate Yes 3-6 Oral, injected
Heroin I Diacetylmorphine, Horse, Smack None High High Yes 3-6 Injected, sniffed, smoked
Hydromorphone II Dilaudid Analgesic High High Yes 3-6 Oral, injected
Meperidine (Pethidine) II Demerol, Mepergan Analgesic High High Yes 3-6 Oral, injected
Methadone II Dolophine, Methadone, Methadose Analgesic High High-Low Yes 12-24 Oral, injected
Other NarcoticsI II III IV V Numorphan, Percodan, Percocet, Tylox, Tussionex, Fentan2 yl, Darvon, Lomotil, Talwin Analgesic, antidiarrheal, antitussive High-Low High-Low Yes Variable Oral, injected
Controlled Substances – Uses and Effects (Continued)
DRUGS CSA SCHEDULES TRADE OR OTHER NAMES MEDICAL USES DEPENDENCE Physical Psychological TOLERANCE DURATION (Hours) USUAL METHODS OF ADMINISTRATION POSSIBLE EFFECTS EFFECTS OF OVERDOSE WITHDRAWAL SYNDROME
DEPRESSANTS
Chloral Hydrate IV Noctec Hypnotic Moderate Moderate Yes 5-8 Oral Slurred speech, disorienta- tion, drunken behavior without odor of alcohol Shallow respiration, clammy skin, dilated pupils, weak and rapid pulse, coma, possible death Anxiety, insomnia, tremors, delirium, convulsions, possible death
Barbiturates II III IV Amytal, Butisol, Florinal, Lotusate, Nembutal, Seconal, Tuinal, Phenobarbital Anesthetic, anticonvulsant, sedative, hypnotic, veterinary euthanasic agent High- Mod. High-Mod. Yes 1-16 Oral
Benzodiazepines IV Ativan, Dalmane, Dlazepam, Librium, Xanax, Serax, Valium, Tranxexe, Verstran, Versed, Halcion, Paxipam, Restoril Antianxiety, anticonvulsant, sedative, hypnotic Low Low Yes 4-8 Oral
Methaqualone I Quaalude Sedative, hypnotic High High Yes 4-8 Oral
Glutethimide III Doriden Sedative, hypnotic High Moderate Yes 4-8 Oral
Other Depressants III IV Equanil, Miltown, Noludar, Placidyl, Valmid Antianxiety, sedative, hypnotic Moderate Moderate Yes 4-8 Oral
Controlled Substances – Uses and Effects (Continued)
DRUGS CSA SCHEDULES TRADE OR OTHER NAMES MEDICAL USES DEPENDENCE Physical Psychological TOLERANCE DURATION (Hours) USUAL METHODS OF ADMINISTRATION POSSIBLE EFFECTS EFFECTS OF OVERDOSE WITHDRAWAL SYNDROME
STIMULANTS
1 Cocaine II Coke, Flake, Snow, Crack Local anesthetic Possible High Yes 1-2 Sniffed, smoked, injected Increased alertness, excitation, euphoria, increased pulse rate and blood pressure, insomnia, loss of appetite Agitation, increase in body temperature, hallucinations, convulsions, possible death Apathy, long periods of sleep, irritability, depression, disorientation
Amphetamines II Biphetamine, Delcobase, Desoxyn, Dexedrine, Obetrol Attention deficit disorders, narcolepsy, weight control Possible High Yes 2-4 Oral, injected
Phenmetrazine II Preludin Weight control Possible High Yes 2-4 Oral, injected
Methylphenidate II Ritalin Attention deficit disorders,narcolepsy Possible Moderate Yes 2-4 Oral, injected
Other Stimulants III IV Adipex, Cylert, Didrex, Ionamin, Mellat, Plagine, Sanorex, Tenuate, Taperul, Prelu-2 Weight control Possible High Yes 2-4 Oral, injected
Controlled Substances – Uses and Effects
DRUGS CSA SCHEDULES TRADE OR OTHER NAMES MEDICAL USES DEPENDENCE Physical Psychological TOLERANCE DURATION (Hours) USUAL METHODS OF ADMINISTRATION POSSIBLE EFFECTS EFFECTS OF OVERDOSE WITHDRAWAL SYNDROME
HALLUCINOGENS
LSD I Acid, Microdot None None Unknown Yes 8-12 Oral Illusions and hallucina- tions, poor perception of time and distance Longer, more intense "trip" episodes, psychosis, possible death Withdrawal syndrome not reported
Mescaline and Peyote I Mexc, Buttons, Cactus None None Unknown Yes 8-12 Oral
Amphetamine Variants I 2.5-DMA, PMA, STP, MDA, None Unknown Unknown Yes Variabl Oral, injected
MDMA, TMA, DOM, DOB e
Phencyclidine II PCP, Angel Dust, Hog None Unknown High Yes Days Smoked, oral,
injected
Phencyclidine Analogues I PCE, PCPy, TCP None Unknown High Yes Days Smoked, oral,
injected
Other Hallucinogens I Buloterine, Ibogaine, DMT, DET, None None Unknown Possible Variable Smoked, oral,
Psilocybin, Psilocyne injected, sniffed
Controlled Substances – Uses and Effects
DRUGS CSA SCHEDULES TRADE OR OTHER NAMES MEDICAL USES DEPENDENCE Physical Psychological TOLERANCE DURATION (Hours) USUAL METHODS OF ADMINISTRATION POSSIBLE EFFECTS EFFECTS OF OVERDOSE WITHDRAWAL SYNDROME
CANNABIS
Marijuana I Pot, Acapulco Gold, Grass, Reefer, Sinsemilla, Thai Sticks None Unknown Moderate Yes 2-4 Smoked, oral Euphoria, relaxed, inhibitions, increased, appetite, disoriented, behavior Fatigue, paranoia, possible psychosis Insomnia, hyperactivity, and decreased appetite occasionally reported
Tetrahydrocannabinol I II THC, Marinol Cancer chemotherapy, antinauseant Unknown Moderate Yes 2-4 Smoked, oral
Hashish I Hash None Unknown Moderate Yes 2-4 Smoked, oral
Hashish Oil I Hash Oil None Unknown Moderate Yes 2-4 Smoked, oral
1 Designated a narcotic under the GSA. 2 Not designated a narcotic under the GSA.

Bacterial Meningitis Notice 2018-19

Important Information You Need to Know about Bacterial Meningitis

The following information is being provided to all new college students in the state of Texas. Bacterial Meningitis is a serious and potentially deadly disease that can progress extremely fast – so take utmost caution. It is an inflammation of the membranes that surround the brain and spinal cord. The bacteria that cause meningitis can also infect the blood. This disease strikes about 3,000 Americans each year, including 100-125 on college campuses, leading to 5-15 deaths among college students every year. There is a treatment, but those who survive may develop severe health problems or disabilities.

Symptoms include: high fever, severe headache, vomiting, sensitivity to light, stiff neck, confusion and sleepiness, nausea, lethargy and seizures. There may be a rash of tiny, red-purple spots caused by bleeding under the skin. These can occur anywhere on the body. The more symptoms, the higher the risk, so when these symptoms appear, seek immediate medical attention.

How is Bacterial Meningitis diagnosed?

Diagnosis is made by a medical provider and is usually based on a combination of clinical symptoms and laboratory results from spinal fluid and blood tests. Early diagnosis and treatment can greatly improve the likelihood of recovery.

How is the disease transmitted?

The disease is transmitted when people exchange saliva (such as by deep-throat kissing, sharing drinking containers, utensils, cigarettes, toothbrushes, etc.) or come in contact with bacteria-infected respiratory or throat secretions.

How do you increase your risk of getting Bacterial Meningitis?

Exposure to saliva by sharing cigarettes, water bottles, eating utensils, food, kissing, etc., as well as living in close conditions (such as sharing a room/ suite in a dorm or group home) increases your risks of contracting the disease.

What are the possible consequences of the disease?

  • Death (in 8 to 24 hours from perfectly well to dead)
  • Permanent brain damage
  • Kidney failure Learning disability
  • Hearing loss, blindness
  • Limb damage (fingers, toes, arms, legs) that requires amputation
  • Gangrene
  • Coma Convulsions

Can the disease be treated?

Antibiotic treatment, if received early, can save lives and chances of recovery are increased. However, permanent disability or death can still occur.

Attention Students: Proof of Meningitis Vaccination Required

What: State of Texas immunization requirement for bacterial meningitis

When: Effective spring 2014 semester and all semesters thereafter

Who: Students (21 years of age or younger) must provide the college with proof of meningitis vaccination if:

  • You are enrolling for the first time as a credit student.
  • You are returning after a semester break in enrollment.
  • You are transferring to a DCCCD college from another college or university.
  • You are a new or returning continuing education student enrolled in programs with 360 contact hours or more.
  • You are a distance education student who lives in Texas (based on your actual mailing address – post office boxes cannot be used as proof of residency).
  • You are a Dual Credit, Middle College, Early College or Charter High School student attending classes at a college of DCCCD.
  • You are a continuing education student who is enrolled in concurrent credit courses.

Deadline: You must submit proof of vaccination (or booster shot within the last five years) to your college’s Admissions Office before registering for class. The date of the vaccination must be at least 10 days before the first day of class. This allows time for the vaccination to take effect.

Where: Take proof of bacterial meningitis vaccination to the Admissions Office at the college where you are enrolled.

Exceptions to the new law: You do not need to provide proof of meningitis vaccination under several exceptions.

  • You are 22 years of age or older (by the first day of the semester in which you are enrolled).

  • You are enrolled in distance education courses and you live outside of the state of Texas or outside of the United States.

  • You are enrolled in a continuing education course or program that is less than 360 contact hours or in continuing education corporate training.

  • You are enrolled in one or more Dual Credit courses taught at a public or private K-12 facility which is not located on a DCCCD campus.

  • You are a student (continuing education or credit) at a DCCCD college who is incarcerated in a Texas prison.

Exemptions: A student at a DCCCD college or the student’s parents/guardians are not required to submit evidence of the bacterial meningitis vaccination if the student, parent or guardian submits one of the following affidavits, based on health and well-being or for reasons of conscience, including religious beliefs. For either of these exemptions, you must submit to the Admissions Office:

  • An affidavit or certificate signed by a physician who is duly registered and licensed to practice medicine in the United States in which it is stated, in the doctor’s opinion, that the vaccination would injure the health and well-being of the student; or
  • An affidavit signed by the student stating that she or he declines to take the vaccination for bacterial meningitis for reasons of conscience, including religious belief. In lieu of the affidavit the student may apply for an exemption from the vaccination requirement for reasons of conscience by completing the online form located at the following website.

dshs.state.tx.us/immunize/school/publications.aspx

Students may obtain bacterial meningitis vaccinations from their own physicians, local health departments, clinics, area pharmacies and similar facilities.

For more information about bacterial meningitis, visit the Centers for Disease Control at cdc.gov/meningitis

For details about DCCCD’s procedures, visit the Admissions office at any of the district’s seven colleges.

Learn more about the State of Texas’ Meningitis Vaccine Requirements at dcccd.edu/Meningitis

Bacterial Meningitis Vaccinations

Vaccinations are available and should be considered for people living in close quarters and college students 21 years of age or younger. Vaccinations are effective against four of the five most common bacterial types that cause 70 percent of the disease in the U.S. (The vaccination does not protect against all types of meningitis). Vaccinations take seven to 10 days to become effective, with protection lasting three to five years. The cost of vaccine varies,

so check with your health care provider. The bacterial meningitis vaccination is very safe. The most common side effects are redness and minor pain at injection site which may last up to two days.

For more information, contact your health care provider.

Contact your Student Health Center at:

  • Brookhaven: 972-860-4195
  • Cedar Valley: 972-860-8277
  • Eastfield: 972-860-7190
  • El Centro: 214-860-2113
  • Mountain View: 214-860-8713
  • North Lake: 972-273-3170
  • Richland: 972-238-6135

All students are charged with knowing the contents and provisions of DCCCD’s policies, procedures, and regulations concerning student conduct. Complete details can be found at dcccd.edu/CSCH.

Student Code of Conduct Notice

Hazing

Summary of Chapter 37, Subchapter F of the Texas Education Code

The Texas Education Code defines hazing as any intentional, knowing, or reckless act, occurring on or off the campus of an educational institution, by one person alone or acting with others, directed against a student, that endangers the mental or physical health or safety of a student for the purpose of pledging, being initiated into, affiliating with, holding office in, or maintaining membership in an organization. For more information on what qualifies as hazing, please see Texas Education Code, Section 37.151(6),

State law prohibits hazing by any person or organization and provides punishment by fines and/or imprisonment, as appropriate. Engaging in an act of hazing is also a violation of the College District Student Code of Conduct [FLB (LOCAL)] and is subject to disciplinary action as outlined therein.

A person’s consent to hazing, express or implied, is not a defense to criminal prosecution or disciplinary action under the Student Code of Conduct.

A person may commit the offense of hazing either directly or indirectly. Indirect acts include recklessly permitting hazing to occur or failure to report first- hand knowledge of planned or past hazing.

Title IX and Campus Sexual Assault

In accordance with Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 and Section 51.9363 of the Texas Education Code, the College District prohibits sexual misconduct, including sexual assault, in all of its programs and activities, including in its dual credit, early college high school, and charter high school programs. Sexual Misconduct is defined as any act of sex/gender-based discrimination or harassment, sexual harassment, sexual violence, sexual exploitation, relationship violence, sex/gender-based stalking, and any other conduct that threatens the health and safety of any person on the basis of actual, expressed or perceived gender identity.

The College District’s sexual misconduct policy applies to any instance in which a student or employee is alleged to have engaged in sexual misconduct against any person or believes he or she has been subjected to sexual misconduct, regardless of sex, gender, sexual orientation, or gender identity. The College District will respond to any complaint of sexual misconduct, including conduct alleged to have occurred during breaks, leaves of absence or periods of dismissal, whether on or off College District property or premises.

A person who is found to have violated the College District sexual misconduct policy shall be subject to all applicable College District disciplinary sanctions as outlined in the College District Board Policy Manual. Violations of the sexual misconduct policy that are also violations of law may also be subject to sanctions by civil and criminal authorities. College District disciplinary action with respect to any act of sexual misconduct on the part of a student or employee shall proceed during the pendency of civil and/or criminal proceedings and shall not be subject to challenge on the ground that civil and/or criminal charges involving the same incident have been filed, dismissed or reduced. For more information on the College District’s sexual misconduct policy, including reporting procedures, please see the College District Board Policy Manual [DIAA (LOCAL), FFDA (LOCAL), and DIA (REGULATION)].

Students Rights Under FERPA:

A Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act

dcccd.edu/FERPA

FERPA affords students certain rights with respect to their education records. These rights include:

  1. The right to inspect and review the student’s education records within 45 days of the day the College receives a request for access. Students should submit to the registrar, dean, head of the academic department, or other appropriate official, written requests that identify the record(s) they wish to inspect. The College official will make arrangements for access and notify the student of the time and place where the records may be inspected. If the records are not maintained by the College official to whom the request was submitted, that official shall advise the student of the correct official to whom the request should be addressed.
  2. The right to request the amendment of the student’s education records that the student believes is inaccurate. Students may ask the College to amend a record that they believe is inaccurate. They should write the College official responsible for the record, clearly identify the part of the record they want changed, and specify why it is inaccurate. If the College decides not to amend the record as requested by the student, the College will notify the student of the decision and advise the student of a right to a hearing regarding the request for amendment. Additional information regarding the hearing procedures will be provided to the student when notified of the right to a hearing.

  3. The right to provide written consent to disclosures of personally identifiable information contained in the student’s education records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent. One exception, which permits disclosure without consent, is disclosure to school officials with legitimate educational interests. A school official is a person employed by the College in an administrative, supervisory, academic or research, or support staff position (including campus law enforcement personnel and health staff); a person serving on the Board of Trustees; or a student serving on an official committee, such as a disciplinary or grievance committee, or assisting another school official in performing a task. A school official also may include a volunteer or contractor outside of the College who performs an institutional service of function for which the College would otherwise use its own employees and who is under the direct control of the College with respect to the use and maintenance of personally identifiable information from education records, such as an attorney, auditor, or collection agent. A school official has a legitimate educational interest if the official needs to review an education record in order to fulfill the official’s professional responsibility.
  4. The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged failures by the College to comply with the requirements of FERPA. The name and address of the Office that administers FERPA:

    Family Policy Compliance Office U .S. Department of Education 400 Maryland Avenue, SW Washington, D.C. 20202

  5. Certain information, known as directory information, may be released without the student’s consent. Directory information includes:
    • student name;
    • home address;
    • home telephone number;
    • dates of attendance;
    • degrees and awards received;
    • field of study;
    • participation in officially-recognized activities;
    • weight and height of members of athletic teams;
    • student classification;
    • participation in officially-recognized sports;
    • photograph;
    • enrollment status, i.e., full-time, part-time;
    • types of awards received, i.e., academic, technical, tech-prep, or continuing education; or
    • name of the most recent previous institution attended.

Students may request that all or any part of the directory information be withheld from the public by giving written notice to the Registrar’s Office during the first 12 class days of a fall or spring semester or the first four class days of a summer session. Students may protect their directory information at any time during the academic year if they are unable to provide written notice within these time frames.

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) is the law that protects student records.

The following college offices maintain student records:

BROOKHAVEN COLLEGE

Attn: Admissions Office 3939 Valley View Lane
Farmers Branch, TX 75244-4997
Phone: 972-860-4883
Fax: 972-860-4886
Email : bhc@dcccd.edu
Office hours: Monday-Thursday, 8 a.m.-7 p.m. Friday, 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m.

CEDAR VALLEY COLLEGE

Attn: Admissions Office 3030 N. Dallas Ave.
Lancaster, TX 75134-3799
Phone: 972-860-8201
Fax: 972-860-8001
Email : cvc@dcccd.edu
Office hours: Monday-Thursday, 8 a.m.-7 p.m. Friday, 8 a.m.-5 p.m.

EASTFIELD COLLEGE

Attn: Admissions Office 3737 Motley Drive
Mesquite, TX 75150-2099
Phone: 972-860-7167
Fax: 972-860-8306
Email : efc@dcccd.edu
Office hours: Monday-Thursday, 8 a.m.-7 p.m. Friday, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.

EL CENTRO COLLEGE

Attn: Admissions Office 801 Main St.
Dallas, TX 75202-3604
Phone 214-860-2311
Fax: 214-860-2233
Email : ecc@dcccd.edu
Office hours: Monday-Thursday, 8 a.m.-7 p.m. Friday, 8 a.m.-4 p.m.

MOUNTAIN VIEW COLLEGE

Attn: Admissions Office 4849 W. Illinois Ave.
Dallas, TX 75211-6599
Phone: 214-860-8600
Fax: 972-698-3074
Email : Registrar-MVC@dcccd.edu
Office hours: Monday, 8 a.m.-7 p.m., Tuesday–Wednesday, 8 a.m.-5 p.m., Thursday, 8 a.m.-7 p.m., Friday, 8 a.m.-5 p.m.

NORTH LAKE COLLEGE

Attn: Admissions Office 5001 N. MacArthur Blvd. Irving, TX 75038-3899
Phone: 972-273-3183
Fax: 972-273-3112
Email : nlc@dcccd.edu
Office hours: Monday-Thursday, 8:30 a.m.-6:30 p.m. Friday, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m.

RICHLAND COLLEGE

Attn: Admissions Office 12800 Abrams Road
Dallas, TX 75243-2199
Phone: 972-238-6100
Fax: 972-238-6229 or 972-238-6346
Email : rlc@dcccd.edu
Office hours: Monday-Thursday, 8 a.m.-7 p.m. Friday, 8 a.m.-5 p.m.


Dallas County Community College District 1601 S. Lamar St. • Dallas, TX 75215-1816 dcccd.edu

The seven independently accredited colleges of the Dallas County Community College District are part of an equal opportunity system that provides education and employment opportunities without discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, sex, disability, age, sexual orientation, gender identity or gender expression.