Drug Free Schools and Communities

Under the Drug Free Schools and Communities Act, Dallas College (“College​”) is required to provide a written statement to students covering:

  1. standards of conduct concerning drugs and alcohol;
  2. federal, state and local legal sanctions governing the unlawful possession or distribution of illicit drugs or alcohol;
  3. health risks associated with the use of illicit drugs and the abuse of alcohol;
  4. a description of counseling and treatment programs available for alcohol and drug abuse;
  5. College disciplinary sanctions imposed for unlawful possession, use or distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol.

The College and its administrative facilities are committed to creating an educational and work environment free from use or distribution of illicit drugs and abuse of alcohol. The College prohibits the unlawful use, possession, distribution, manufacture, possession for purposes of distribution, or sale of illicit drugs or alcohol on College property or premises or at College-sponsored activities, except as authorized by the Chancellor with respect to a specific event, instructional program or activity.

College Disciplinary Sanctions

All students and employees are expected to comply with the College’s drug and alcohol policy. Any student or employee who commits a violation of the College’s drug and alcohol policy shall be subject to all applicable legal sanctions under local, state or federal law, as well as all applicable college disciplinary sanctions up to and including academic suspension or expulsion or termination of employment. College disciplinary proceedings will occur in accordance with the procedures outlined in the College Board Policy Manual. Violations of the College drug and alcohol policy that are also violations of federal, state or local law may be referred to the appropriate agency. In such situations, cases may proceed concurrently through the College disciplinary process and in the criminal justice system.

Federal, State and Local Penalties and Sanctions

Local, state and federal laws prohibit the unlawful use, distribution, manufacture, possession for purposes of distribution and sale of alcohol and controlled substances. These laws carry penalties for violations, including, but not limited to, fines up to $20,000.00, imprisonment, forfeiture of property and denial of federal benefits such as student loans, grants, etc. See also Title 21, United States Code (USC), Controlled Substances Act; and Chapter 481, Texas Health and Safety Code, the Texas Controlled Substances Act. Additionally, the different municipalities within Dallas County have ordinances relating to the use of controlled substances for which penalties may be imposed. All applicable legal sanctions under local, state or federal law for the unlawful possess or distribution of illicit drugs or alcohol will be applied.

College Counseling and Treatment Programs

College employees, staff, students, health center professionals, police and counselors are working together to eliminate drug and alcohol abuse both on and off campus. Activities and opportunities vary by college, but all are united to ensure College students and staff are aware of the problems and dangers of drug and alcohol abuse. Information and confidential referrals concerning counseling and treatment programs for drug and alcohol abuse may be obtained from any College Counseling and/or Advisement Center, Health Center and/or location Human Resources Office.

Red Ribbon Campaigns

In conjunction with Texas War on Drugs Week and National Red Ribbon Day, some of the College campuses hold Red Ribbon Day in the month of October. Students who are committed to living drug-free wear red ribbons on that day. Throughout the academic year, various student activities are offered by the college to promote a drug-free lifestyle.

Recover Network Groups/Alcoholics Anonymous/12-Step Programs

Some of the campuses of Dallas College have 12-step or other recovery programs to help individuals overcome chemical or alcohol dependency. You can get information about these programs through your campus Health Center or counseling offices.

Alcohol-Free Happy Hour

Dallas College Student Life offices present various alcohol-free activities as alternatives to the kind of social events that are built around alcohol and/or drug use. Drop by your campus office for information about the many student activities and intramural sports programs for both day and evening students.

If you want to be a part of any of these or other programs promoting a drug-free lifestyle or if you need counseling, visit with your campus counselor, Office of Student Life or Health Center for more information.

Alcohol Effects

Health hazards associated with the excessive use of alcohol or with alcohol dependency include dramatic behavioral changes, delayed motor skills, and impairment of reasoning and rational thinking. These factors result in a higher incidence of accidents and accidental death for such persons than in nonusers of alcohol. Nutrition also suffers, and vitamin and mineral deficiencies are frequent. Prolonged alcohol abuse causes bleeding from the intestinal tract, damage to nerves and the brain, psychotic behavior, loss of memory and coordination, damage to the liver often resulting in cirrhosis, impotence, severe inflammation of the pancreas, and damage to the bone marrow, heart, testes, ovaries, and muscles. Damage to the nerves and organs is usually irreversible. Cancer is the second leading cause of death in alcoholics and is 10 times more frequent than in nonalcoholics.

Repeated use of alcohol can lead to dependence. Sudden cessation of alcohol intake is likely to produce withdrawal symptoms, including severe anxiety, tremors, hallucinations and convulsions. Alcohol withdrawal can be life-threatening. Long-term consumption of large quantities of alcohol, particularly when combined with poor nutrition, can also lead to permanent damage to vital organs such as the liver or the brain.

Mothers who drink alcohol during pregnancy may give birth to infants with fetal alcohol syndrome. These infants have irreversible physical abnormalities and mental retardation. In addition, research indicates that children of alcoholic parents are at greater risk of becoming alcoholics.

Drug Effects

The use of illicit drugs usually causes the same general type of physiological and mental changes as alcohol, although frequently, those changes are more severe and sudden. Death or coma resulting from overdose of drugs is more frequent than from alcohol. Drugs can be categorized into five major categories or schedules. Those categories are listed here. Below the categories is a table of Federal Trafficking Penalities.

Drug Schedules

Drug categories (or schedules) depend on the drug acceptable medical use and the drug abuse or dependency potential. For example, Schedule I drugs have a high potential for abuse and the potential to create severe psychological and/or physical dependence. As the drug schedule changes-- so does the abuse potential-- Schedule V drugs represent the least potential for abuse. A list of drugs and their corrosponding schedules can be found in the Controlled Substance Act (CSA) Scheduling (www.dea.gov/druginfo/ds.shtml) These lists describe the basic or parent chemical and do not necessarily describe the salts, isomers and salts of isomers, esters, ethers and derivatives which may also be classified as controlled substances. These lists are intended as general references and are not comprehensive listings of all controlled substances.

Please note that a substance need not be listed as a controlled substance to be treated as a Schedule I substance for criminal prosecution. A controlled substance analogue is a substance which is intended for human consumption and is structurally or pharmacologically substantially similar to, or is represented as being similar to, a Schedule I or Schedule II substance and is not an approved medication in the United States. (See 21 U.S.C. §802(32)(A) for the definition of a controlled substance analogue and 21 U.S.C. §813 for the applicable schedule.)

Schedule I

Schedule I drugs, substances, or chemicals are defined as drugs with no currently accepted medical use and a high potential for abuse. Some examples of Schedule I drugs are: heroin, lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), marijuana (cannabis), 3,4-ethylenedioxymethamphetamine (ecstasy), methaqualone, and peyote.

Schedule II

Schedule II drugs, substances, or chemicals are defined as drugs with a high potential for abuse, with use potentially leading to severe psychological or physical dependence. These drugs are also considered dangerous. Some examples of Schedule II drugs are: Combination products with less than 15 milligrams of hydrocodone per dosage unit (Vicodin), cocaine, methamphetamine, methadone, hydromorphone (Dilaudid), meperidine (Demerol), oxycodone (OxyContin), fentanyl, Dexedrine, Adderall, and Ritalin

Schedule III

Schedule III drugs, substances, or chemicals are defined as drugs with a moderate to low potential for physical and psychological dependence. Schedule III drugs abuse potential is less than Schedule I and Schedule II drugs but more than Schedule IV. Some examples of Schedule III drugs are: Products containing less than 90 milligrams of codeine per dosage unit (Tylenol with codeine), ketamine, anabolic steroids, testosterone

Schedule IV

Schedule IV drugs, substances, or chemicals are defined as drugs with a low potential for abuse and low risk of dependence. Some examples of Schedule IV drugs are: Xanax, Soma, Darvon, Darvocet, Valium, Ativan, Talwin, Ambien, Tramadol

Schedule V

Schedule V drugs, substances, or chemicals are defined as drugs with lower potential for abuse than Schedule IV and consist of preparations containing limited quantities of certain narcotics. Schedule V drugs are generally used for antidiarrheal, antitussive, and analgesic purposes. Some examples of Schedule V drugs are: cough preparations with less than 200 milligrams of codeine or per 100 milliliters: (Robitussin AC), Lomotil, Motofen, Lyrica, Parepectolin

An updated and complete list of the schedules is published annually in Title 21 Code of Federal Regulations (C.F.R.) §§ 1308.11 through 1308.15.

dea.gov/druginfo/ds.shtml

Federal Trafficking Penalties - Chart One

DRUG/SCHEDULE QUANTITY PENALTIES QUANTITY PENALTIES

Cocaine (Schedule II)

500–4999 grams mixture

First Offense: Not less than 5 yrs, and not more than 40 yrs. If death or serious injury, not less than 20 or more than life. Fine of not more than $5 million if an individual, $25 million if not an individual.

Second Offense: Not less than 10 yrs, and not more than life. If death or serious injury, life imprisonment. Fine of not more than $8 million if an individual, $50 million if not an individual.

5 kgs or more mixture

First Offense: Not less than 10 yrs, and not more than life. If death or serious injury, not less than 20 or more than life. Fine of not more than $10 million if an individual, $50 million if not an individual.

Second Offense: Not less than 20 yrs, and not more than life. If death or serious injury, life imprisonment. Fine of not more than $20 million if an individual, $75 million if not an individual.

2 or More Prior Offenses: Life imprisonment. Fine of not more than $20 million if an individual, $75 million if not an individual.

Cocaine Base (Schedule II)

28–279 grams mixture

280 grams or more mixture

Fentanyl (Schedule II)

40–399 grams mixture

400 grams or more mixture

Fentanyl Analogue (Schedule I)

10–99 grams mixture

100 grams or more mixture

Heroin (Schedule I)

100–999 grams mixture

1 kg or more mixture

LSD (Schedule I)

1–9 grams mixture

10 grams or more mixture

Methamphetamine (Schedule II)

5–49 grams pure or 50–499 grams mixture

50 grams or more pure or 500 grams or more mixture

PCP (Schedule II)

10–99 grams pure or 100–999 grams mixture

100 gm or more pure or 1 kg or more mixture

DRUG/SCHEDULE QUANTITY PENALTIES

Other Schedule I & II drugs (and any drug product containing Gamma Hydroxybutyric Acid)

Any amount

First Offense: Not more than 20 yrs. If death or serious injury, not less than 20 yrs, or more than life. Fine $1 million if an individual, $5 million if not an individual.

Second Offense: Not more than 30 yrs. If death or serious bodily injury, life imprison- ment. Fine $2 million if an individual, $10 million if not an individual.

Flunitrazepam (Schedule IV)

1 gram

Other Schedule III drugs

Any amount

First Offense: Not more than 10 years. If death or serious injury, not more that 15 yrs. Fine not more than $500,000 if an individual, $2.5 million if not an individual.

Second Offense: Not more than 20 yrs. If death or serious injury, not more than 30 yrs. Fine not more than $1 million if an individual, $5 million if not an individual.

All other Schedule IV drugs

Any amount

First Offense: Not more than 5 yrs. Fine not more than $250,000 if an individual, $1 million if not an individual.

Second Offense: Not more than 10 yrs. Fine not more than $500,000 if an individual, $2 million if other than an individual.

Flunitrazepam (Schedule IV)

Other than 1 gram or more

All Schedule V drugs

Any amount

First Offense: Not more than 1 yr. Fine not more than $100,000 if an individual, $250,000 if not an individual.

Second Offense: Not more than 4 yrs. Fine not more than $200,000 if an individual, $500,000 if not an individual.

FEDERAL TRAFFICKING PENALTIES—MARIJUANA
DRUG QUANTITY 1st OFFENSE 2nd OFFENSE *

Marijuana (Schedule I)

1,000 kg or more marijuana mixture; or 1,000 or more marijuana plants

Not less than 10 yrs. or more than life. If death or serious bodily injury, not less than 20 yrs., or more than life. Fine not more than $10 million if an individual, $50 million if other than an individual.

Not less than 20 yrs. or more than life. If death or serious bodily injury, life imprisonment. Fine not more than $20 moillion if an individual, $75 million if other than an individual.

Marijuana (Schedule I)

100 kg to 999 kg marijuana mixture; or 100 to 999 marijuana plants

Not less than 5 yrs. or more than 40 yrs. If death or serious bodily injury, not less than 20 yrs., or more than life. Fine not more than $5 million if an individual, $25 million if other than an individual.

Not less than 10 yrs. or more than life. If death or serious bodily injury, life imprisonment. Fine not more than $20 moillion if an individual, $75 million if other than an individual.

Marijuana (Schedule I)

More than 10 kgs hashish; 50 to 99 kg marijuana mixture

More than 1 kg of hashish oil; 50 to 99 marijuana plants

Not less than 20 yrs. If death or serious bodily injury, not less than 20 yrs., or more than life. Fine $1 million if an individual, $5 million if other than an individual.

Not less than 30 yrs. If death or serious bodily injury, life imprisonment. Fine $2 million if an individual, $10 million if other than an individual. .

Marijuana (Schedule I)

Less than 50 kilograms marijuana (but does not include 50 or more marijuana plantsregardless of weight) marijuana plants;

1 to 49 marijuana plants;

Not less than 5 yrs. Fine not more than $250,000, $1 million if other than an individual

Not less than 10 yrs. Fine $500,000 if an individual, $2 million if other than individual

Hashish (Schedule I)

10 kg or less

Hashish Oil (Schedule I)

1 kg or less

*The minimum sentence for a violation after two or more prior convictions for a felony drug offense have become final is a mandatory term of life imprisonment without release and a fine up to $20 million if an individual and $75 million if other than an individual.