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Science, Technology, Engineering and Math

 
 
 
Summit Panelists
Program Agenda
Science, Technology, Engineering and Math Tree
The panelists share strategies and information about valuable resources that are available to  your institution as you form partnerships with community colleges and minority-serving institutions to increase student enrollment in the STEM pipeline.
The program agenda outlines the day's event with information about our keynote speaker, panelists and the roundtable discussions.
Summit Panelists
The panelists share strategies and information about valuable resources that are available to  your institution as you form partnerships with community colleges and minority-serving institutions to increase student enrollment in the STEM pipeline.
Program Agenda
The program agenda outlines the day's event with information about our keynote speaker, panelists and the roundtable discussions.
Science, Technology, Engineering and Math Tree
CLICK TREE TO VIEW  LARGER IMAGE.

The workforce summit addresses two major statewide initiatives:

1) Closing the Gap
2) Rethink, Revise and Retool

Our focus is on programs that have been designed to narrow the gaps in science, technology, math, and engineering as we foster career development in the STEM fields.

While there are various initiatives that focus on the recruitment of students in STEM fields, there are a limited number of initiatives that are specifically geared towards the recruitment of minorities and women. Our goal is to strengthen programs to increase enrollment in STEM programs. Our city, state, nation and global community will reap the benefits of us educating this population of students in these areas of study.

Leaders in higher education institutions must address this challenge and heed the call to work collectively and collaboratively in this effort as we build global competitiveness in Texas through the STEM programs.



"The present day millennium students are faced with many more challenges than students of 20 years ago resulting in a lack of interest and preparation in the STEM fields of study. Therefore, engineering schools must address this issue as a realistic threat to the core fabric and future of engineering education. It is my opinion that the leadership of engineering schools throughout the country must be both cognizant and equipped to develop strategic plans to overcome this shrinkage of the STEM pipeline."
                                            -
Kendall Harris (Dean of Prairie View College of Engineering)